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in the upper galilee, or lower syria. after the war, many who had been forced out of jerusalem moved north and settled in these villages. new leadership was evolving here with the pharisees, the rabbis who gave fresh interpretation to the ancient jewish traditions. matthew's community felt threatened by these changes. >> the followers of jesus were certainly very much on the fringe of the jewish community. obviously, the early preachers had hoped that they would convert the whole majority of their people. but they were bitterly disappointed to find that only a very few accepted their rather improbable stories. and they remained very much on the fringe of the jewish communities. >> ( dramatized ): the gospel of matthew is concerned with the position of these early christian churches within israel. and it's very important that jesus, for matthew, is fully a man from israel. therefore, matthew begins his gospel by taking, probably, all the genealogy of jesus and now traces this back to abraham. for matthew, jesus is a son of abraham. that is, he is truly a man from israel. >> the way matthew
of roman syria. >> antioch has one of the largest jewish communities outside of the jewish homeland-- it's been suggested that maybe something like 40,000 people in this jewish community. so we can... we must imagine a number of different jewish congregations and subsections of the city in and through which paul could have moved and still felt very much at home within the jewish community. >> wherever you have a sufficient number of jews, you would have a jewish community. wherever you have a jewish community, you would have a jewish synagogue. >> narrator: by the fourth century, the synagogue had become a formal place of worship. but in paul's day, especially in the diaspora, it was more of a community center. >> another remarkable feature of the synagogues in the diaspora is not only that they attracted large crowds of people, but among these crowds will have been gentiles. there is no barrier between jews and gentiles, and gentiles found the jewish synagogues-- and the jews themselves, apparently-- as open, friendly and why not go to the jewish synagogue? especially because there are
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)